Pres-cut, AZ

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First a word about the Tesla GPS…
Sometimes the GPS will give wrong verbal directions near the target and in very tight situations – it will say ‘make a U-turn’ when ‘make a left-turn’ is the correct instruction. Therefore, it is advisable that you zoom in on the target at very high magnification. Then you can observe exactly where the visual pointer is, in relation to the streets around it – the pointer will be right, even if the verbal instruction is wrong. An example of this is the Flagstaff Supercharger, located at the Marriott Courtyard. When approaching the hotel from the north, the instruction given is to make a U-turn at the intersection where the entrance to the Marriott is located, instead of making a left-turn into the parking lot. If you have zoomed in on the map location, you will notice this inconsistency.

Cristie & Larry

Cristie & Larry

Day 40 – 28 June: Prescott, AZ is where Craig’s cousin Larry lives in with his wife Cristie. Of course you can tell the locals from the tourists by the way they pronounce the city’s name. Press-cut for the locals and Pres-scott for the tourists, hence the title of this blog entry.

Coming into Prescott, Patty and I thought, “sagebrush and suburbs — this is what they retired too?” When you finally reach the town of Prescott, it is very picturesque and likes to flaunt its cowboy image. In the area where Larry and Cristie live there is a forest of pine trees and practically no sagebrush. It is such a completely different environment from its neighbors that we were stunned. It is the first place Patty has ever said, “I might want to retire to here.”

Prescott-Courthouse

Prescott Courthouse grounds

Whiskey Row

Whiskey Row

After we unpacked and relaxed, we were taken to the ‘Old Town’ center of the city. The picture of the town street is called Whiskey Row and is across the street from the courthouse and a wooded park. The centerpiece of the street is the Palace Saloon and a key part of the town’s history. When there was a large fire, before the turn of the 20th century, the cowboys lassoed the bar and pulled it out of the structure and into the street, where they reset it up and continued drinking while the buildings burned down. It is the same bar that is in the Palace Saloon today. Men and women are dressed in authentic dress of the day – including pistols – and can be found drinking and serving in the saloon.


Prescott-Palace-Saloon-inside

The

Prescott-Palace-Saloon-outside

Palace

Prescott-Palace-Saloon-motorcycles-welcome

Saloon


The following morning it was back to town to eat breakfast at the Lone Spur Cafe. The food was good, the portions were large, and the walls were covered with old west paraphernalia. Quite the local hangout.

Prescott-150-years Prescott-Lone-Spur-Cafe Prescott-Lone-Spur-Cafe-food


We stayed longer than we at first intended – just too relaxing and comfortable – before setting off to see how the Wickenburg, AZ Supercharger construction was coming along. Highway 89 between Prescott and Wickenburg is a winding road through the mountains and a sports car enthusiasts’ dream. Part of the switchbacks over the mountain have the opposing lanes of traffic using entirely different routes. This means you have about 1.5 lanes of road with no oncoming traffic. Craig could drive like a Formula One driver and this was another way to push the Tesla. It passed with flying colors and Patty didn’t even lose any lunch on the way.

Wickenburg Supercharger construction wasn’t very far along, but they had torn up the roadway where it was to be located and you could see the concrete structure with vertical pipes that would house the transformer. Now it was on to Phoenix, AZ – our last stop before traveling home. We have visited here a number of times before, so it was almost like it was the end of our trip. However, that is the subject of our next entry.

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